Archives For Breakin’ the Law

2012-07-24 16.01.04

Think those reminders to teens about not texting and driving are working?

Well, probably not.

Asia’s largest automaker (Toyota) and the University of Michigan’s Transportation Research Institute found in a new study that teens are 26 times more likely to send texts while driving than their parents expect.

A whopping 69 percent of teens regularly drive with their peers and no adults. About 54 percent said they use a handheld mobile phone while driving.

All this tends to point to more unsafe behavior behind the wheel.

On the flip side of this story though is the anecdote about a teen who drove his Mustang off a cliff and survived, thanks to his iPhone. He wasn’t talking or texting but after the accident occurred, his father was able to locate him by tracking down his phone through AT&T.

The car was totaled and he had to have brain surgery but apparently he will be all right.

Check out the Automotive News story on the teen texting report on here and see the Mustang and the surviving teen story from Jalopnik here.

An astounding 700,000 cars were stolen in the U.S. last year.

While that’s actually a decrease of 3.3 percent, at the same time the number of newer vehicles being stolen (cars from ’09-’11) is increasing, at least according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau.

Intuitively you would think newer cars would be more difficult to jack, but apparently not! Which really should emphasize a car owner’s need for aftermarket security.

The top most-stolen new vehicles from the new survey were:

1) The 2009 Nissan Altima

2) The 2009 Honda Accord

3) The 2009 Honda Civic

4) The 2009 Dodge Charger, and

5) (Motorcycle alert!) the 2009 Yamaha YZF-R6

See the list of newer cars from MSN Autos here.

One of the more “entertaining” news items we ran across: A car thief that’s willing to go the extra mile!

In West Hartford, Conn., one Keith Hinds allegedly stole a Chinese restaurant’s delivery truck during one of its stops. Would that be the end of it? No, that wasn’t nearly enough of a night for him …

Police said Hinds then proceeded to finish the remaining deliveries, collecting the money from customers for himself.

That was nice and all, but apparently it never occurred to him that the stranded driver might be able to call his boss and the police to let them know.

The latter, of course, were waiting for the “new delivery man” after he dropped off some food. Maybe this scientist is right, humans are getting less intelligent.

Read more about the alleged car thief-turned-delivery man from Jalopnik below:

Enterprising Thief Steals a Chinese Food Delivery Car and Keeps Delivering Food to Customers

A little while ago we posted about the Hennessey Cadillac.

Some people online suggested the car might not … handle so well.

We wouldn’t be able to say unless we saw some rigorous testing, but we know how it would do at high speeds. Of course the interesting part of this story is that they did this on a real road.

Texas wanted to test its toll tag system to see if it could accurately report fines at triple-digit speeds.

Hennessey brought a Camaro that hit 203.9 mph! Not bad.

The CTS-V broke that easily by hitting, that’s right … a whopping 220.5 mph!!!!

Pretty casually, we might add.

Check out the full high-speed video below:

Also check out a quick post on the high-speed highway monster from Motoramic here.

The Range Rover, a luxury SUV.
Credit: Wikipedia.

Don’t think your SUV is less of a target because you’ve removed loose valuables from the interior.

Some thieves aren’t looking for your electronics devices or your briefcase or what have you. No, they want your third row seat!

ABC News is reporting that “third seat theft” is on the rise in Texas and California.

That’s right, crooks are taking the seats and selling them for as much as $1,000. That’s a lot of loot especially for something that can be stolen so easily.

Police recommend you engrave your vehicle’s VIN number on the seat structure or using a bike lock to make it more difficult to unhinge. But frankly the latter will not slow them down much.

And they omit the most obvious solution: a superior car alarm!

Watch the video and see how quickly the robbers are able to access the truck through the back. In less than a minute they’ve accomplished their task while drawing no attention to themselves.

In our opinion, the time to thwart a thief is before they gain entry into your ride. Being able to recover the seats is all well and good, but we’d rather not have to go through that hassle.

Considering how much it costs to replace the third row at the dealership, a wise investment in protecting your vehicle is a must.