Archives For BMW

bmw-i3-coupe-conceptMaybe the “i”s have it.

Or rather BMW has them. As in their “i” line of cars.

But for the company, the new electric vehicles are supposedly part of a larger vision for sustainability.

With its investments in car-sharing businesses DriveNow, presumably like the Car2go model, and even mass transit systems, the Bavarian carmaker is making a strong case for their stated goal to support different types of transportation, and not simply the automobile

It will even apply their green strategy for how the vehicles are made.

The head of the interior design team for the new models says they will use 50 percent less energy and 70 percent less water during manufacturing. Impressive numbers.

Of course for car-centric consumers they will be much more interested in the numbers of the i3 and i8 in and of themselves. And also, the i3 Coupe Concept which will be on display this week at the L.A. Auto Show.

Is it only us, or does the rear three-quarter view of the car strike you as a bit Pontiac Aztek, albeit sleeker and with more appeal? See Jalopnik’s take on the electric here.

Or get some straight specs from Motoramic — or read more about company’s overall direction from The New York Times.

Ever since we saw James Bond’s submarining Lotus, we’ve wanted a vehicle that can really get off-road!

Well, just in time for Daniel Craig’s new Bond movie Skyfall set to hit screens Nov. 9, here’s this little nugget.

If you’re like us, you’re probably pleased to hear that the Quadski will soon be on sale in the U.S. This is the first commercially available amphibious vehicle available here.

OK, it’s not cheap, but somewhat in the realm of realistic possibilities with a price tag of $40,000.

The all-terrain “boat” has a BMW-supplied engine, has a top speed of 45 mph on land and at the touch of a button, within five seconds, the four wheels fold and tuck into the sides for travel on water at the same speed as on dirt.

An ATV may be cheaper, but man, this could be a lot more fun!

Check out a full report on the new amphibious vehicle from the San Fransisco Chronicle below here:

Amphibious Vehicle to Go On Sale Soon in the U.S.

Remember the story we brought you in early July about BMWs disappearing (being stolen actually) in less than three minutes?

Well if you don’t, here’s a quick recap — car thieves in the U.K. used an over-the-counter key fob to bypass the security systems of several BMWs in a matter of minutes. The fob was able to deactivate the luxury cars’ current settings so criminals could make a quick getaway and not leave a trace of evidence that the car was stolen.

Worried that BMW doesn’t care if your $30,000 investment is growing feet and running off in the middle of the night? Well rest easy, because BMW is making some serious changes to ensure that your luxury vehicle is protected.

In a statement, BMW made it clear that they want to ensure the protection of their customer’s vehicles: “All our cars meet all security standards and regulations, but as responsible manufacturers we are looking at ways of mitigating against this new kind of attack.”

The automaker said that actions they’re taking include enhancing the security on models previous to the 2011 series, and contacting owners to ensure they get the necessary work taken care of on their vehicle.

Don’t be a victim of this high-tech crime — replace that standard security system and protect your $30,000-plus investment!

Remember that we told you back in July that there’s a lesson here for car owners: Thieves will always find a way to get into your car – what you need is real-time awareness of when/where someone tries to violate your vehicle.

We asked our engineers and experts here for the best tips on just what these criminals are doing and how car owners can fight back against them.

They told us:

Number 1.      In order to steal a car, the thief doesn’t need to reprogram the key right away. The criminal just needs to bypass the vehicle immobilizer quickly using potentially bulkier equipment — and drive away. Key reprogramming can be dealt with later at a secure location with less time constraint (let’s say 15-30 minutes).

Number 2.      BMW security has a hole: It employs a relatively weak, 48-bit Hitag system that can be hacked in under 3 minutes using computer hardware costing less than $10,000. There is also a known weakness in the randomization of the security key and its dependency on the CAS (one of the vehicle’s modules) dump. Such a dump is available over OBD connector. In other words, all components for a system are available on the Internet and putting the system together does not require a lot of technical skill.

Our experts were quite sure that BWM engineers are well aware of these shortcomings and are working on tighter the security and probably on upgrading their encryption method as well. That will address BMW’s security issue — but also will make any key-cracking job harder.

Number 3.      In order to deploy such a system, one needs to bypass the vehicle alarm system. The OEM one-way security is susceptible to jamming while more sophisticated two-way systems provide real-time status feedback and have additional sensors, etc.

Get connected to your vehicle and get ahead of the criminals: Thieves will always find a way to get into your car – what you need is real-time awareness of when/where someone tries to violate your vehicle.

Watch a BMW go in under 3 minutes and a BBC report here:

BMW Owners Hit by High-Tech Theft

See the whole quick-as-lightening BMW theft video below:

Car art or insanity? You make the call.

As most of us do our best to swat flies AWAY, French artist Natacha Mercier did her best to collect them. Using fly paper, a greenhouse, and 100,000 flies along with a Mercedes Benz — the artist created this mobile piece of art.

What inspired this outlandish work of art you ask? The artist said after watching a man decked out in all-white attire and sporting gold “bling” exit his BMW, she witnessed the women around her (herself included) “Drop like flies.” Thus the creation of the fly-covered car.

Upon completion, the artist took the car for a joyride through the streets of Toulouse, France, while onlookers gawked at the vehicle — much like the scenario that inspired it.

What do you think?! Art or just plain crazy?!

Check out the hot video of the fly corpse-covered monstrosity here:

Every … second … counts, case in point: Hackers stealing a BMW 1M stolen without keys — in 3 minutes!

There’s a lesson here for all car owners: Thieves will always find a way to get into your car – what you need is real-time awareness of when/where someone tries to violate your vehicle.

This viral video from the UK posted below blew up in the last week, and has already landed half a million hits since July 3.

In it, the hackers exploit a security loophole, using gizmos that plug into the vehicle’s OBD port — then programming the blank key fobs and taking off in their new ill-gotten cars.

According to this recent Jalopnik piece posted on MSNBC’s Technolog, the car is entered, “either via nearby RF jammers that block the fob lock signal from reaching the car (preventing owners from securing their vehicles) or, more crudely, by breaking a window. … In cases of the window break, the thieves seem to be exploiting a gap in the car’s internal ultrasonic sensor system to avoid tripping the alarm.”

When the thieves get in — they hack into the vehicle key fob’s digital ID so that they can program a different fob to interact with the car. The hackers make that work by first connecting some kind of device to the soon-to-be stolen vehicle’s OBD-II connector, the MSNBC post said.

Now listen up, Viper fans — you can protect yourselves and make sure that you don’t suffer from the same super-swift car theft.

We asked our engineers and experts here for the best tips on just what these criminals are doing and how car owners can fight back against them.

They told us:

Number 1.      In order to steal a car, the thief doesn’t need to reprogram the key right away. The criminal just needs to bypass the vehicle immobilizer quickly using potentially bulkier equipment — and drive away. Key reprogramming can be dealt with later at a secure location with less time constraint (let’s say 15-30 minutes).

Number 2.      BMW security has a hole: It employs a relatively weak, 48-bit Hitag system that can be hacked in under 3 minutes using computer hardware costing less than $10,000. There is also a known weakness in the randomization of the security key and its dependency on the CAS (one of the vehicle’s modules) dump. Such a dump is available over OBD connector. In other words, all components for a system are available on the Internet and putting the system together does not require a lot of technical skill.

Our experts were quite sure that BWM engineers are well aware of these shortcomings and are working on tighter the security and probably on upgrading their encryption method as well. That will address BMW’s security issue — but also will make any key-cracking job harder.

Number 3.      In order to deploy such a system, one needs to bypass the vehicle alarm system. The OEM one-way security is susceptible to jamming while more sophisticated two-way systems provide real-time status feedback and have additional sensors, etc.

Get connected to your vehicle and get ahead of the criminals: Thieves will always find a way to get into your car – what you need is real-time awareness of when/where someone tries to violate your vehicle.

See the whole quick-as-lightening BMW theft video below: