Archives For car theft

2012-07-24 16.00.48Pheeeeeeeeew!!!!!

Oh, well thank goodness for those little things.

We’re sure a lot of guys will be relieved to hear that model Jess Barton has recovered the parts to her prized 1000+ horsepower Supra.

Police found a house that apparently was a huge chop shop where most of her disassembled car was identified in different rooms.

We’re happy for her, and for this opportunity to share this pic of the still-intact vehicle.

It’s unfortunate that she and her bikini-clad friend had to block the shot.

Make sure to check it out!

Read more about the bikini-clad stuff and the recovered Supra from Jalopnik here.

(Also, don’t forget, if you got a crazy, souped-up car, get a Viper system on there stat ….)

2012-07-24 16.00.56Viper SmartStart to the rescue!

We swear we had no part in influencing the instituting of this ordinance.

The police in Madison say it’s a violation to leave unattended cars running — and the purpose of the ordinance is to prevent car thefts!

Maybe not all the folks there know about remote start systems, but clearly they should go to the appropriate store and get one for their vehicles, given that the cold weather will likely persist for at least another month.

That way you can warm your car, the cabin and avoid the hefty fine if you start your ride with the key in the ignition while you wait indoors.

Read more about the Wisconsin ordinance from Madison.com here.

Jessica Barton.Credit: Facebook.

Jessica Barton.
Credit: Facebook.

It’s unclear if model Jessica Barton had any security for her super custom 1,165 hp Supra.

But it’s not uncommon for many even super high-profile car enthusiasts to skimp on, say, a car alarm or security system in favor of some performance-related aftermarket product for their ride.

However, if you’re spending thousands, if not tens of thousands on your vehicle, then paying a little more for peace of mind seems like a small price to pay.

Barton spent years putting together her ride and unfortunately thieves completely disassembled it for the parts.

The speedy swimsuit model had offered a $5,000 reward to anyone who helped her find the vehicle — but later sent out an Instagram post saying that it was too late and showing a pic of Supra parts piled up in a lot.

“That car has been evolving over 8 years and hundreds of thousands probably invested in it,” Barton said in a comment on the Instagram post.

“I could never just build another one. It’s imposible (sic) to do all this again. It’s a devastating loss to me,” she said.

Want to read more?

Check out even more on the story from Motoramic here.

The Range Rover, a luxury SUV.
Credit: Wikipedia.

Don’t think your SUV is less of a target because you’ve removed loose valuables from the interior.

Some thieves aren’t looking for your electronics devices or your briefcase or what have you. No, they want your third row seat!

ABC News is reporting that “third seat theft” is on the rise in Texas and California.

That’s right, crooks are taking the seats and selling them for as much as $1,000. That’s a lot of loot especially for something that can be stolen so easily.

Police recommend you engrave your vehicle’s VIN number on the seat structure or using a bike lock to make it more difficult to unhinge. But frankly the latter will not slow them down much.

And they omit the most obvious solution: a superior car alarm!

Watch the video and see how quickly the robbers are able to access the truck through the back. In less than a minute they’ve accomplished their task while drawing no attention to themselves.

In our opinion, the time to thwart a thief is before they gain entry into your ride. Being able to recover the seats is all well and good, but we’d rather not have to go through that hassle.

Considering how much it costs to replace the third row at the dealership, a wise investment in protecting your vehicle is a must.

Remember the story we brought you in early July about BMWs disappearing (being stolen actually) in less than three minutes?

Well if you don’t, here’s a quick recap — car thieves in the U.K. used an over-the-counter key fob to bypass the security systems of several BMWs in a matter of minutes. The fob was able to deactivate the luxury cars’ current settings so criminals could make a quick getaway and not leave a trace of evidence that the car was stolen.

Worried that BMW doesn’t care if your $30,000 investment is growing feet and running off in the middle of the night? Well rest easy, because BMW is making some serious changes to ensure that your luxury vehicle is protected.

In a statement, BMW made it clear that they want to ensure the protection of their customer’s vehicles: “All our cars meet all security standards and regulations, but as responsible manufacturers we are looking at ways of mitigating against this new kind of attack.”

The automaker said that actions they’re taking include enhancing the security on models previous to the 2011 series, and contacting owners to ensure they get the necessary work taken care of on their vehicle.

Don’t be a victim of this high-tech crime — replace that standard security system and protect your $30,000-plus investment!

Remember that we told you back in July that there’s a lesson here for car owners: Thieves will always find a way to get into your car – what you need is real-time awareness of when/where someone tries to violate your vehicle.

We asked our engineers and experts here for the best tips on just what these criminals are doing and how car owners can fight back against them.

They told us:

Number 1.      In order to steal a car, the thief doesn’t need to reprogram the key right away. The criminal just needs to bypass the vehicle immobilizer quickly using potentially bulkier equipment — and drive away. Key reprogramming can be dealt with later at a secure location with less time constraint (let’s say 15-30 minutes).

Number 2.      BMW security has a hole: It employs a relatively weak, 48-bit Hitag system that can be hacked in under 3 minutes using computer hardware costing less than $10,000. There is also a known weakness in the randomization of the security key and its dependency on the CAS (one of the vehicle’s modules) dump. Such a dump is available over OBD connector. In other words, all components for a system are available on the Internet and putting the system together does not require a lot of technical skill.

Our experts were quite sure that BWM engineers are well aware of these shortcomings and are working on tighter the security and probably on upgrading their encryption method as well. That will address BMW’s security issue — but also will make any key-cracking job harder.

Number 3.      In order to deploy such a system, one needs to bypass the vehicle alarm system. The OEM one-way security is susceptible to jamming while more sophisticated two-way systems provide real-time status feedback and have additional sensors, etc.

Get connected to your vehicle and get ahead of the criminals: Thieves will always find a way to get into your car – what you need is real-time awareness of when/where someone tries to violate your vehicle.

Watch a BMW go in under 3 minutes and a BBC report here:

BMW Owners Hit by High-Tech Theft

See the whole quick-as-lightening BMW theft video below: