Archives For car theft

Every … second … counts, case in point: Hackers stealing a BMW 1M stolen without keys — in 3 minutes!

There’s a lesson here for all car owners: Thieves will always find a way to get into your car – what you need is real-time awareness of when/where someone tries to violate your vehicle.

This viral video from the UK posted below blew up in the last week, and has already landed half a million hits since July 3.

In it, the hackers exploit a security loophole, using gizmos that plug into the vehicle’s OBD port — then programming the blank key fobs and taking off in their new ill-gotten cars.

According to this recent Jalopnik piece posted on MSNBC’s Technolog, the car is entered, “either via nearby RF jammers that block the fob lock signal from reaching the car (preventing owners from securing their vehicles) or, more crudely, by breaking a window. … In cases of the window break, the thieves seem to be exploiting a gap in the car’s internal ultrasonic sensor system to avoid tripping the alarm.”

When the thieves get in — they hack into the vehicle key fob’s digital ID so that they can program a different fob to interact with the car. The hackers make that work by first connecting some kind of device to the soon-to-be stolen vehicle’s OBD-II connector, the MSNBC post said.

Now listen up, Viper fans — you can protect yourselves and make sure that you don’t suffer from the same super-swift car theft.

We asked our engineers and experts here for the best tips on just what these criminals are doing and how car owners can fight back against them.

They told us:

Number 1.      In order to steal a car, the thief doesn’t need to reprogram the key right away. The criminal just needs to bypass the vehicle immobilizer quickly using potentially bulkier equipment — and drive away. Key reprogramming can be dealt with later at a secure location with less time constraint (let’s say 15-30 minutes).

Number 2.      BMW security has a hole: It employs a relatively weak, 48-bit Hitag system that can be hacked in under 3 minutes using computer hardware costing less than $10,000. There is also a known weakness in the randomization of the security key and its dependency on the CAS (one of the vehicle’s modules) dump. Such a dump is available over OBD connector. In other words, all components for a system are available on the Internet and putting the system together does not require a lot of technical skill.

Our experts were quite sure that BWM engineers are well aware of these shortcomings and are working on tighter the security and probably on upgrading their encryption method as well. That will address BMW’s security issue — but also will make any key-cracking job harder.

Number 3.      In order to deploy such a system, one needs to bypass the vehicle alarm system. The OEM one-way security is susceptible to jamming while more sophisticated two-way systems provide real-time status feedback and have additional sensors, etc.

Get connected to your vehicle and get ahead of the criminals: Thieves will always find a way to get into your car – what you need is real-time awareness of when/where someone tries to violate your vehicle.

See the whole quick-as-lightening BMW theft video below:

Wow.

That’s … a little embarrassing there, buddy.

A recent ridiculous shot from Jalopnik.com captures one of those ridiculed-for-life moments, and offers some sound advice: Look, if you ever want to steal a car, make sure the owner can’t hit a button and trap you inside — and also try to NOT be slobbering drunk and shirtless.

(And try not to throw up all over the place once they haul you out.)

A BMW owner’s wife heard his car alarm going off, and the owner promptly stepped outside, remote locked his car and trapped the offender, and snapped a couple pics.

The mumbling shirtless moron told cops he thought is was his FRIEND’S car.

Yup … well, maybe he even did.

Read the whole story from Jalopnik.com.

When I was this old, I think I was still playing with G.I. Joes!

I KNOW that I wasn’t thinking about stealing cars — or even driving cars!!!!

An ABC News video captured an 11-year-old jacking a “bait” car in a bait car sting by police in Albuquerque, N.M.

After climbing in and somehow starting the engine — the 11-year-old bandito then has a little fun: taking the vehicle out for a little ridiculous underage joyride. The way-too-young car thief even stops to pick up some friends — who are all 10 years old!!!!

“Come on guys! Jump in.”

Holy ba-geezal — it’s too much to even believe.

When fiddling with the radio, one of the kids thinks that he spots a police officer — and alerts the other to “look out!” The video shows the group slouching down to avoid being seen.

Watch the whole crazy video here.

And tell your kids not to steal cars!!!!

It’s like a low-tech “Minority Report.”

Lathrop, Calif., lovebirds Steve and Amanda Nelson are taking to YouTube after their tricked-out Honda Accord got boosted right in front of their house.

The couple apparently uses their dog Pismo as their super-cheap car alarm option (whoops! That might be their first mistake right there, maybe try a REAL alarm.) The normally peaceful pooch first confronted the thieves when they slunk up alongside the house:

“She doesn’t bark, so I elbowed him a little bit and I said, ‘Babe,’ and he said, ‘I’m going, I’m going,’” Amanda told FOX40 in Sacramento.

Steve ran around to the front of the house, just in time to see the car rolling on away.

Now on the hunt, the couple has slapped the footage on YouTube, imploring the help of anyone who sees either the thieves or their car — along with a message to the ne’er-do-wells:

“Try working for what you want in life and you can have the nice things we have without stealing,” Amanda told FOX40.

Check out the YouTube footage below: