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Do we really need cars expressly designed for women?

After all, isn’t that why we have certain makes and models that only females seem to buy? You know who you are!

But Honda thinks it’s a good enough of an idea to launch the Honda Fit She’s in Japan. It features a “Plasmacluster” climate control system to supposedly improve your skin quality and it has UV-blocking window glass to protect against those harmful, age-accelerating rays.

Uh yeah, we don’t know about that, but hey, we’re all for anything that helps our ladies looking beautiful.

Check out more full coverage and some video on “The Car Made Just for Women” from the Today show here:

Honda Introduces Car Designed Just for Women

If that’s too much estrogen for you, then follow the story of Honda’s newest compact sports car, designed to compete against Subaru’s BRZ and Scion’s FR-S, here:

Honda Confirms Production of New-Generation Beat

The Chevy Aveo, or Sonic.
Credit: Wikipedia.

For you dealers: You want to know what kind of cars you’re likely to work on in the future?

It’ll probably be a subcompact or compact.

Now you may say that owners of those types of vehicles wouldn’t want to spend the extra money on aftermarket gear because they bought smaller cars in order to save their loot in the first place! An analyst at TrueCar.com says that’s no longer the case.

Take a look at the Cruze, Sonic, the Fiat 500, the new Dart, along with the already established models in the category. What you see aren’t necessarily only economy cars. They could easily be seen as stylistic choices, if you will.

Laugh if you want … but major hallmark brands like Honda, Chevrolet and Toyota are cashing in on small cars — which, according to AutoNews.com, are helping push the biggest sales month in four years and are also capturing the biggest segment of the U.S. auto market since 1993.

(Let’s face it, soaring prices at the pump haven’t helped this trend, either.)

The U.S. automakers aren’t slacking, although Honda and Toyota still lead the small-sized pack. AutoNews.com was quick to point out that Chrysler’s Fiat set a second straight monthly record, Ford rolled out more small cars than any other September in a decade, and GM’s Chevy last month won the subcompact segment with the Sonic and the compact with the Cruze.

Read more about the “Small Wonder” car trend from AutoNews.com below:

Small Car Sales May Capture Largest U.S. Share Since 1993

Handout photo from the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles.

All right, apparently these robotic, self-driven cars are already a guarantee — so when’s it gonna be already?

On the roads next to you in half a decade?

According to the automaker Ford, driverless cars will be sharing the U.S. roadways with human drivers by 2017, reports ExtremeTech.

Think that U.S. culture can adjust to the robot-driven way of life that quickly?

Japan by 2020?

Not to be outdone, the Land of the Rising Sun is also promising driverless cars by 2020, according to Japan’s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, transport and Tourism (MLIT).

Now hold on, this is also no joke.

This statement by the Japanese government represents the FIRST time that any government in the world has expressed a commitment to pursue the future of driverless cars.

The industry’s heavy hitters that are joining in are also nothing to scoff at.

We’re talking Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Fuiji, and Mazda. Yeah, those are the big boys.

The Japanese government promises a report on the status of their program some time around March 2013.

Sunshine State Closer Than Ever?

[Quick hit here: We have to give a shout out to this comment thread from Digg that suggests driverless cars could bankrupt California.]

With a unanimous vote, California’s Assembly Transportation Committee passed legislation that would allow testing and the regulation of driverless vehicles.

The vote is still just preliminary, advancing the legislation along.

According to an article from ComputerWorld, it passed on the condition that debate would continue on the language to limit the liability of automakers.

Still mired in squabbling, but it’s coming — are we ready for this?