Archives For in-car technology

The Hyundai Genesis, named the 2009 North American Car of the Year.Credit: Wikipedia.

The Hyundai Genesis, named the 2009 North American Car of the Year.
Credit: Wikipedia.

This is a pretty cool video demonstration.

Not that we haven’t seen this technology, but it’s the context that is intriguing.

Video games have been using gesture technology for a while, and Hyundai is incorporating that into cars.

Nevermind smudging touchscreens, pushing buttons or turning dials. Soon that will be a thing of the past.

If carmakers have their way, we’ll be twisting our wrists, waving our hands and pointing fingers so that 3D motion sensors can decipher what our movements are indicating.

Thanks in part to the technology developed by Tobii, we’re all going to look like third base coaches in baseball, making funny signs as we drive — or rather, conduct our automobiles.

Check out full coverage on the crazy hand-gesture driving from Jalopnik here.

Handout photo from the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles.

Handout photo from the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles.

Some sobering news about autonomous or self-driving cars.

After the recap of the state of the technology from Audi, Lexus and Google, the writer asks what the real hurdle to adoption of this will be.

It’s not the technology, as these manufacturers are showing that we’re already almost there.

Rather the problem will be the new rules associated with a world full of computer-driven vehicles.

How to legislate for what happens when technology goes awry is bound to push the ETA for these super-automobiles. And then of course there’s the cost.

Which is to say — be prepared to handle gridlock with your own hands and feet for well into the next decade.

Read more about the robot-driven car movement from DigitalTrends.com here.

Handout photo from the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles.

Handout photo from the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles.

Manufacturers are really keen on making self-driving cars a reality!

When we’re driving, we want to DRIVE. But certainly it would be nice to let the computer take over during bumper-to-bumper rush-hour traffic.

We won’t get there for a while, but Toyota and Audi showed off the state of the technology at CES last week with some demos.

Nevada has already legalized autonomous vehicles for public roads, issuing Google the first license of its kind last year.

More companies undoubtedly will follow suit.

These computer-controlled vehicles use visual indicators, artificial intelligence software (which is what they’ll use to take over the world!), GPS and various sensors to navigate their way.

Check out more on the robot-driven cars from CNET here.

When communication between vehicles gets to be commonplace, the group that will be breathing the biggest sigh of relief may be motorcyclists.

Honda has been working on an electronic beacon that can alert drivers to an approaching motorcycle before it’s even in view.

The Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) allows cars and motorcycles to communicate between each other in addition to receiving information from roadside ITS stations. The standardized data exchange message, which is sent between the networked vehicles, contains an identifier for motorcycles, so they can then take the necessary precautions.

Besides warning cars that a motorcycle is in the area, other merits of Honda’s safety device is its ability to communicate with roadside ITS stations — which will provide notifications on hazards like road work, broken-down vehicles, or weather warnings.

It can also warn of traffic jams and provide useful data like “green light optimal speed” to help avoid catching red lights and keep traffic flowing.

Read full coverage on the Honda ITS from Motorcycle-USA.com below here:

Honda ITS Lets Cars/Motorcycles Communicate

Handout photo from the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles.

The company that tries to do no harm even as it tries to do it all has made great progress on a self-driving car.

It even drives some Google employees to work. And California is set to legalize these autonomous autos.

The only real hurdle appears to be — you guessed it, cost! As in hundreds of thousands of dollars (or more than those uber-rich guys that you’re super-jealous of pay for a Ferrari).

So … apparently your robot-driven car of the future is gonna cost you a pretty penny.

The array of sensor technology needed for the cars to work costs about $250,000 dollars, according to The Business Insider. That’s just the technology, if you toss in the price of the Lexus RX45oh cars, which the search giant is modifying to fit the need, and throw in a few custom components — you’re suddenly looking at a car that’s running you well more than $300,000!

This is the part where you ask yourself, how badly do you want that car? If it’s worth any opportunity cost, better start saving up now and get it before they add MORE high-tech expenses! I mean it’s already more expensive than a Ferrari, get it while you got a chance!

That said, maybe the driverless car will debut like any other trendy high-tech item on the open market, and the price will fall down to levels that average drivers can even begin to afford over time.

Read more about the driverless machine that will leave you penniless from The Business Insider below:

Google’s Self-Driving Cars May Cost More Than A Ferrari (GOOG)