Archives For Japan

We can’t tell if this is a joke or not. Our Japanese needs a lot of work.

But supposedly someone has invented a solution for the nearly silent Prius. How about a speaker that plays the sound of fearsome F1 engines? Now pedestrians and cyclists will know when you’re approaching. But they’ll probably bust into laughter when they hear that racing roar from your green compact car.

Of course we would assume you could program any sound for playback. As in, “Hey, get the heck off the street!” We’re sure a few of you will have a more “creative” recording in mind.

What do you think, is this a joke or not? We can’t tell.

A well-completed project, huh? They fixed an unnecessary problem (the noise of the car), and then were able to fix their mistake by adding some sound affects to the car. Smooth move!

Let’s keep our cars traditional, and let the engines roar! Show off that souped up motor! Let people know that YOU’RE approaching! Vroom Vroom! What do you say?

To read more about the deadly stealth Prius, check out this story from Jalopnik below:

The Sound of a Screaming F1 Engine Will Fix the Prius ‘Silent Killer’ Problem

YouTube footage of the first sneak peek at the 2013 Honda Accord.

With the intense competition in the mid-size category, we wonder if Honda can attain dominance again with its next Accord. If you look at what the other automakers have done or are planning, it seems to us that consumers’ eyes may stray, given the wealth of options they have available in this multimillion-dollar market.

Honda says the company “is back” with its 2013 Accord — but many experts say the automaker is playing it safe, hoping to capture buyers with the same design integrity that they have provided their consumers with for so long. Although some consumers may find that security appealing, Honda is being criticized for playing it safe considering the big changes that have occurred in the mid-sized market.

The changes that have been made to the new Accord are subtle, a more sculpted exterior that is smaller, and a more spacious interior. The 2013 Accord will also feature the Earth Dreams engine and transmission.

With many mid-sized competitors like Hyundai getting complete design overhauls, will Honda’s new design be able to compete for the top spot, or will they remain in the number two slot they are currently occupying?

So what do you prefer readers: A new, sleek and innovative design or the reliability associated with the brand?

Check out video of the new Honda Accord here.

Or for more in-depth coverage, you can see an AutoNews Now video report on the 2012 Accord and Honda’s new push for a comeback here.

Handout photo from the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles.

All right, apparently these robotic, self-driven cars are already a guarantee — so when’s it gonna be already?

On the roads next to you in half a decade?

According to the automaker Ford, driverless cars will be sharing the U.S. roadways with human drivers by 2017, reports ExtremeTech.

Think that U.S. culture can adjust to the robot-driven way of life that quickly?

Japan by 2020?

Not to be outdone, the Land of the Rising Sun is also promising driverless cars by 2020, according to Japan’s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, transport and Tourism (MLIT).

Now hold on, this is also no joke.

This statement by the Japanese government represents the FIRST time that any government in the world has expressed a commitment to pursue the future of driverless cars.

The industry’s heavy hitters that are joining in are also nothing to scoff at.

We’re talking Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Fuiji, and Mazda. Yeah, those are the big boys.

The Japanese government promises a report on the status of their program some time around March 2013.

Sunshine State Closer Than Ever?

[Quick hit here: We have to give a shout out to this comment thread from Digg that suggests driverless cars could bankrupt California.]

With a unanimous vote, California’s Assembly Transportation Committee passed legislation that would allow testing and the regulation of driverless vehicles.

The vote is still just preliminary, advancing the legislation along.

According to an article from ComputerWorld, it passed on the condition that debate would continue on the language to limit the liability of automakers.

Still mired in squabbling, but it’s coming — are we ready for this?